Daily News, via SOTT.net aggregation.

Finnish PM blames Russia for GPS glitches during NATO war games - UPDATE

Finnish PM blames Russia for GPS glitches during NATO war games - UPDATE

Finland's malfunctioning GPS signal was caused by Russia, and not the 50,000 troops, 10,000 combat vehicles and 250 aircraft taking part in massive Scandinavian NATO drills - at least that's what the PM thinks probably happened. Aside from the public pooing, prolific beer-guzzling and frigate-sinking naval mishaps, NATO's Trident Juncture drills - the largest in decades - also suffered from spotty GPS signals. Regrettably, only one of these hiccups could remotely be attributed to Russian deviancy. Right on cue, Finnish Prime Minster Juha Sipila has stated that "it is possible" that Russia was the "disrupting party" (referring to the GPS problems, not the pooping near Norwegian kindergartens). Comment: It's also possible Russia is responsible for literally everything that goes wrong everywhere on the planet. Possible, but not likely. "We will investigate, and then we will respond," he added. "This is not a joke, it threatened the air security of ordinary people." Too impatient to...

Russia unveils reusable nuclear rocket engine for Mars mission: 'Elon Musk is using old tech'

Russia unveils reusable nuclear rocket engine for Mars mission: 'Elon Musk is using old tech'

A leading Russian space research center has posted a video of its nuclear-powered rocket, that will be able to land on Mars after seven months, and can be re-launched into space just 48 hours after landing. "A mission to Mars is possible in the very near future, but that's not an aim in itself. Our engines can be the foundation for a whole range of space missions that currently seem like science fiction," Vladimir Koshlakov, who heads Moscow's Keldysh Research Center told Rossiyskaya Gazeta. The institute, which is famous for developing the Katyusha rocket launched during World War II, has been working on what it says is a "unique" propulsion system since 2009. From past descriptions, it comprises a gas-cooled fission reactor that powers a generator, which in turn feeds a plasma thruster.

Cuba withdraws More Doctors program from Brazil after criticism from president-elect Jair Bolsonaro

Cuba withdraws More Doctors program from Brazil after criticism from president-elect Jair Bolsonaro

The decision comes after Brazil's far-right president-elect Jair Bolsonaro criticized the program and the Cuban government. Cuba's Ministry of Public Health announced Wednesday it is withdrawing from the Mais Medicos (More Doctors) cooperation program with Brazil, which functioned since August 2013 and ensured health coverage for over a hundred million Brazilians who had no prior access to healthcare. Cuban health authorities also announced they had notified the Pan-American Health Organization and its Brazilian counterparts of the decision to end its participation in the program.

Post-bromance spat: Trump taunts Macron for country's losses to Germany in both World Wars, low approval ratings and wine policy

Post-bromance spat: Trump taunts Macron for country's losses to Germany in both World Wars, low approval ratings and wine policy

President Trump continued his verbal spat with French leader Emmanuel Macron, taunting the French leader for his country's losses to Germany in two world wars, and suggesting that Europe needs the US as a saviour. After returning from Armistice Day commemorations in Paris over the weekend, Trump took to Twitter on Monday to savage the US' European allies for failing to meet their defense spending targets and leaving America to foot much of NATO's bill. On Tuesday, the president vented his frustrations again. "Emmanuel Macron suggests building its own army to protect Europe against the U.S., China and Russia," Trump tweeted. But it was Germany in World Wars One & Two - How did that work out for France? They were starting to learn German in Paris before the U.S. came along. Pay for NATO or not! In a radio interview a week before the commemorations in Paris, Macron called for the establishment of an EU army that can defend the continent "without relying only on the United States."...

Food tastes are too subjective to by copyrighted, says EU court

Food tastes are too subjective to by copyrighted, says EU court

Not every experience can be copyrighted, at least for now, an EU court has ruled, dismissing a Dutch cheesemaker's suit against a rival it accused of infringing on its signature taste. Dutch cheesemaker Levola Hengelo sued rival Smilde for copyright infringement, alleging the company's leek-and-garlic cheese spread was a rip-off of Levola's own Heksenkaas ("witches' cheese"). Dutch courts, stumped, passed the case on to the EU's Court of Justice. Stating that "the taste of a food product cannot be identified with precision and objectivity," the European court dismissed the suit, pointing out copyright can only be applied to a "work" - an "original intellectual creation" - and an "expression" of that creation. "Unlike, for example, a literary, pictorial, cinematographic or musical work, which is a precise and objective expression, the taste of a food product will be identified essentially on the basis of taste sensations and experiences, which are subjective and variable," the court...

Giant impact crater found under Greenland ice

Giant impact crater found under Greenland ice

Scientists have discovered a crater beneath Greenland's Hiawatha Glacier that they say could be one of the 25 largest impact structures on Earth. It's a 31-kilometre-wide circular bedrock depression up to a kilometre below the ice and was likely caused by a fractionated iron asteroid about a kilometre wide. Its impact would have had substantial environmental consequences in the Northern Hemisphere and perhaps even more widely, say the researchers, led by led by Kurt Kjær from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The crater is the only one of its size that retains a significant portion of its original surface topography. The researchers are unsure of its exact age, but suggest it is unlikely to predate the Pleistocene inception of the Greenland Ice Sheet, more than two million years ago. Using dating techniques, they inferred that the young ice covering the crater is "well behaved" but that deeper and older ice was debris-rich and heavily disturbed. The findings are reported in a...

2,100-year-old pit containing a mini "Terracotta Army" discovered in China

2,100-year-old pit containing a mini "Terracotta Army" discovered in China

Inside a 2,100-year-old pit in China, archaeologists have discovered a miniature army of sorts: carefully arranged chariots and mini statues of cavalry, watchtowers, infantry and musicians. They look like a miniaturized version of the Terracotta Army - a collection of chariots and life-size sculptures of soldiers, horses, entertainers and civil officials - that was constructed for Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China. Based on the design of the newfound artifacts, archaeologists believe that the pit was created about 2,100 years ago, or about a century after the construction of the Terracotta Army.

Czech Republic joins list of countries rejecting UN migration accord

Czech Republic joins list of countries rejecting UN migration accord

Several other European Union countries have already rejected or are reconsidering the pact. Both Hungary and Austria have said they will not sign the agreement at an upcoming ceremony, in Morocco, in December. Early Wednesday, Czech Republic voted to not to sign the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration accord, according to Reuters. "The Czech Republic has long favored the principle of separating legal and illegal migration," Deputy Prime Minister Richard Brabec stated in a news conference. "That is what the Czech Republic's and other European countries' suggestions aimed for. The final text does not reflect those proposals."

FBI reports 17% spike in hate crimes with blacks and Jews the most targeted

FBI reports 17% spike in hate crimes with blacks and Jews the most targeted

The US has seen a 17 percent spike in hate crimes in 2017, with the majority of reported incidents targeting African-Americans and Jews, according to the FBI's annual Hate Crimes Statistics report. The report, released on Tuesday by the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, breaks down hate crime information from last year, broken down by location, offenders, bias types, and victims. A total of 7,175 hate crimes were reported to UCR last year, up from 6,121 in 2016. Of those, the vast majority were "single-bias incidents," meaning the perpetrators were motivated by only one factor. Sixty-nine of the cases involved multiple biases. The majority (59.6 percent) of crimes in the "single-bias incident" category were motivated by a person's race, ethnicity, or ancestry. African-Americans were by far the most targeted, with a reported 2,013 attacks against them, compared to 741 "anti-white" attacks. Religion took second place as a motivating factor, accounting for 20.6 percent of...

May strong-arms cabinet in emergency meeting, this is the deal - now back me on Brexit

May strong-arms cabinet in emergency meeting, this is the deal - now back me on Brexit

Theresa May summoned her cabinet to an emergency meeting on Wednesday afternoon to sign off her long awaited final Brexit deal, prompting hard-Brexit Tories to call for senior ministers to stand up and block it. The critical meeting is the culmination of months of negotiations and will see May's senior ministers consider whether they can personally endorse the agreement that the prime minister has been able to reach. Ministers were summoned to No 10 in the early evening and some met individually with May or her chief of staff, Gavin Barwell. They were given the chance to read the key documents, although they were not trusted to take any papers home. Further one-on-one meetings were expected to take place on Wednesday.

Pence ready for all-out Cold War on China if Beijing refuses to bow to all US demands

Pence ready for all-out Cold War on China if Beijing refuses to bow to all US demands

Washington expects Beijing to undertake a dramatic change in all of its policies to accommodate US demands and is prepared for prolonged hostilities if it does not, Vice President Mike Pence reportedly said. The confrontational stance of the Trump administration was described by journalist Josh Rogin in a Washington Post opinion piece. He said Pence outlined it to him during a flight aboard Air Force Two on the VP's Asian trip. The US wants China to offer concessions on a wide range of grievances, from intellectual property protection to territorial claims in the South China Sea.

New research makes the weak claim that coffee reduces diabetes risk

New research makes the weak claim that coffee reduces diabetes risk

You love coffee but are afraid to indulge because of its supposed health risks? Then the latest research on the effects of coffee will reassure you as it claims coffee helps reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Coffee is actually beneficial to your health in its ability to slash the risk of developing what is now deemed the world's most common long-term health condition, according to a report by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC). In what will come as incredible news to those who worship the world's most common psychoactive drink, you don't need to stick to just one cup a day. In order for caffeine to effectively reduce your risk of developing diabetes by 25 percent, you must drink between three and four, the study claims. It doesn't discriminate between men and women. And even if you prefer decaf you're still ok.

BEST OF THE WEB: Illusion of democracy? If US elections could change anything they wouldn't be held

BEST OF THE WEB: Illusion of democracy? If US elections could change anything they wouldn't be held

Last week's US midterm elections received saturated media coverage. Why? The reality is that elections in the US don't change much, if anything, because America has a regime and is not a genuine democracy. The US midterms - and you'd have to have been locked in a wardrobe all week to have avoided hearing about them - reminded me of a great song by the 1980s indie-rock band The Smiths. No, not 'This Charming Man', in reference to Donald Trump, but 'What Difference Does it Make?' Remember that one? It should be played on a loop every time America goes to vote. Because every couple of years, whenever 'big' elections come along in the US of A, we are treated to the same spectacle. Ordinarily intelligent people making fools of themselves in the belief that the elections are 'tremendously important'. When will they ever learn that the best thing to do on a US election night is to go to bed early with a nice hot water bottle and a good book. Let's take presidential contests first.

Why the Saudi-led 'Golden Victory' siege of Yemen's Hodeida is taking so long

Why the Saudi-led 'Golden Victory' siege of Yemen's Hodeida is taking so long

Saudi ground forces are too weak to stand up to the Houthis in Yemen, and their allies and proxies all have their own goals in mind - making the capture of the key port of Hodeida a strategic snarl, experts say. The coalition offensive on Hodeida - a key port and a lifeline for Houthis and civilians alike - is codenamed 'Operation Golden Victory'. Rather telling, considering the vast amounts of money Saudi Arabia bundles into its military. Ironic, too: it would seem that with such massively superior military resources, the coalition should have stamped the Houthi rebels down within days. Instead, the operation has been dragging on for months. It started in mid-June, then was paused until September for peace talks. Those eventually collapsed, and the fighting resumed. Now, coalition-backed ground forces are moving inside the city after a tense 11-day battle at the approaches. There are running battles in the streets and local hospitals are overflowing with civilians and militants...

New report says UK government developing 'killer robot' drones though it says it isn't

New report says UK government developing 'killer robot' drones though it says it isn't

The British government has been secretly funding research with a view to developing autonomous 'killer robot' drones, despite making public statements to the contrary, an anti-drone campaign group has claimed. Drone Wars UK claims that the Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) is funding research for weapons systems which could make life-or-death decisions without any human input. In an unsettling new report, the group highlighted the Taranis drone, developed over a decade by BAE Systems and the UK Ministry of Defence. The Taranis can fly, plot its own routes and locate targets autonomously - and has cost a cool £200 million so far. The year-long study by Drone Wars UK also uncovered multiple similar research and development programs that they say are being funded by the British MoD, despite public denials of any plans to develop the deadly machines.

How the CDC uses fear and manipulated data to hype up demand for flu vaccines

How the CDC uses fear and manipulated data to hype up demand for flu vaccines

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) claims that tens of thousands of people die annually from the flu, but what the public isn't told is that these numbers come from controversial models that may greatly overestimate, which happens to align with the CDC's stated aim of using fear marketing to increase demand for flu vaccines. The CDC claims that its recommendation that everyone aged six months and up should get an annual flu shot is firmly grounded in science. The mainstream media reinforce this characterization by misinforming the public about what the science says. A New York Times article from earlier this year, for example, in order to persuade readers to follow the CDC's recommendation, cited scientific literature reviews of the prestigious Cochrane Collaboration to support its characterization of the influenza vaccine as both effective and safe. The Times claimed that the science showed that the vaccine represented "a big payoff in public health" and that...

Australian woman finds needle in pear just after strawberry scare arrest

Australian woman finds needle in pear just after strawberry scare arrest

It was just on Sunday when a woman was arrested and charged with contaminating strawberries in Australia's Queensland. But it looks like the fruit saga is far from over as a needle was again spotted... this time in a pear. Clare Bonser, a make up artist with ABC News Breakfast, said she was driving on Tuesday as she casually "chomped on" her pear. For some lucky twist of fate, she happened to look down at the fruit before taking the next bite. That was when she spotted the menace and managed to just narrowly avoid being injured by the spiky item. "At first I just put it on the seat next to me and tried to process what I saw, then realised, 'Oh crumbs'," Bonser said.

Trump's Iran policy: What's 'normal' about starving innocent civilians?

Trump's Iran policy: What's 'normal' about starving innocent civilians?

It's not often that US Government officials are honest when they talk about our foreign policy. The unprovoked 2003 attack on Iraq was called a "liberation." The 2011 US-led destruction of Libya was a "humanitarian intervention." And so on. So, in a way, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was refreshingly honest last week when, speaking about newly-imposed US sanctions, he told the BBC that the Iranian leadership "has to make a decision that they want their people to eat." It was an honest admission that new US sanctions are designed to starve Iranians unless the Iranian leadership accepts US demands. His statement also reveals the lengths to which the neocons are willing to go to get their "regime change" in Iran. Just like then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said it was "worth it" that half a million Iraqi children died because of our sanctions on that country, Pompeo is letting us know that a few million dead Iranians is also "worth it" if the government in Tehran can be...

Evacuation fatigue: California authorities fear people will ignore warnings as wildfires become routine

Evacuation fatigue: California authorities fear people will ignore warnings as wildfires become routine

Authorities fear that residents will increasingly ignore repeated calls to flee as devastating wildfires become routine In 13 months, Meg Brown has evacuated her 3,500-acre family ranch just outside of Oroville three times, as the California wildfires have closed in. After losing animals and historic buildings on Table Mountain Ranch to the 2017 Cherokee fire, she has a plan to respond to such disasters, and how to decide when to stay or go. In recent days, Brown has worked nonstop to secure her animals and livelihood. She and her mother sleep in shifts to ensure the flames of the Camp fire - the deadliest blaze in California state history -don't surprise them in the middle of the night. Brown and her mother left at one point after they could see the glow of the fire creeping toward the property but returned after firefighters were able to push the fire back. That doesn't mean the risk has gone away. High winds have threatened to move the blaze back toward the ranch and the area...

With all First World War veterans dead - the 11th of November has become a macabre event glorifying militarism

With all First World War veterans dead - the 11th of November has become a macabre event glorifying militarism

Of all the modern wars that have claimed millions of lives, the First World War was the most tragic as its origins were in futility, its outcomes were universally negative and its veterans experienced a perfect storm of modern weaponry combined with comparatively primitive medical care. Thus, those who died often experienced painful deaths while those who lived often lived with deep physical and psychological wounds for the rest of their lives - the likes of which those who are not veterans could scarcely imagine. The new political maps of Europe, western Eurasia and the Arab that were carelessly drawn during and after the First World War were not only the proximate cause of the Second World War but remain the underlying cause of multiple contemporary conflicts including those in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, the Israel-Palestine conflict and even the war in Yemen. As the root causes of all of these conflicts were the artificial divides of the Arab world among the imperialists of Britain...

Glamour girl unleashes her toxic femininity on a Porsche Boxster

Glamour girl unleashes her toxic femininity on a Porsche Boxster

One doesn't expect a young woman, wearing a pink coat and high heels, to carry an axe. But the one caught on camera in Kiev not only did but used it to wreck a Porsche Boxster in what appears to be act of revenge. The bizarre scene, which happened in the center of the Ukrainian capital on Tuesday, was filmed by a witness who published it on Facebook. The footage shows the white sports car vandalized in broad daylight with astounded people watching. The perpetrator first used a spray can to write "bastard" on the side of the posh white car and then armed herself with an axe and started chopping its windshield and hood.

NATO drills fallout: Norwegian frigate almost entirely underwater after oil tanker collision

NATO drills fallout: Norwegian frigate almost entirely underwater after oil tanker collision

The Norwegian Navy frigate that tried and failed to return home after parading its might in NATO war games is almost completely submerged under water after colliding with an oil tanker. Eight people were injured when the KNM Helge Ingstad and the tanker Sola TS collided last week off Norway's western coast, putting a not-so-great finish on the much touted Trident Juncture 2018 drills - the largest exercise hosted by Norway since the 1980s and the largest that NATO has held in decades. Since then, the frigate has been slowly sinking. Photos from the scene on Monday show a tiny fraction of the warship above water, with the rest of it completely submerged.

ACTA 2.0: The EU's Article 13 threatens the end of freedom on the Internet

ACTA 2.0: The EU's Article 13 threatens the end of freedom on the Internet

Freedom of expression is a thorn in the side of EU technocrats. The new intellectual property law adopted by the European Parliament in September threatens our fundamental rights.1 Internet means freedom. Still. We can (still) freely retrieve content with our search engines. We can (still) freely and without further ado access the sources in a text. This will soon change. Article 13 of the controversial law says that website operators and Internet providers will be held accountable for the content of their customers and readers. The new law thus obliges them to use the so-called upload filters. The filter obligation leaves it to the software to decide what users are allowed to upload and what not. In plain language it says the provider will control and censor our activities on the net: every uploaded photo, video, every text will be checked. The question arises: what criteria will apply to this censorship and how and by whom will this filter software be programmed?

'Scapegoat framed by US & Mexico': El Chapo's lawyer claims real drug lord walks free & bribes govts

'Scapegoat framed by US & Mexico': El Chapo's lawyer claims real drug lord walks free & bribes govts

Drug lord Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman had been framed by corrupt US and Mexican officials who let his chief lieutenant remain at large to lead the Sinaloa cartel instead, his defense claimed, at the start of the high-profile trial. Guzman was made a 'scapegoat' by a corrupt Mexican government in an American drug war, so that the true head of the drug empire, Ismael 'El Mayo' Zambada, can escape justice, defense attorney for the narcotics baron claimed in his opening statement in Federal District Court in Brooklyn. "[Zambada] has been allowed to operate for the last 55 years because he pays for it," Jeffrey Lichtman told the court in an unexpected start of the hearing. "He bribes the current president of Mexico and for good measure, the previous one as well."

How an outsider in Alzheimer's research bucked the prevailing theory (and he's probably right)

How an outsider in Alzheimer's research bucked the prevailing theory (and he's probably right)

Robert Moir was damned if he did and damned if he didn't. The Massachusetts General Hospital neurobiologist had applied for government funding for his Alzheimer's disease research and received wildly disparate comments from the scientists tapped to assess his proposal's merits. It was an "unorthodox hypothesis" that might "fill flagrant knowledge gaps," wrote one reviewer, but another said the planned work might add little "to what is currently known." A third complained that although Moir wanted to study whether microbes might be involved in causing Alzheimer's, no one had proved that was the case. As if scientists are supposed to study only what's already known, an exasperated Moir thought when he read the reviews two years ago.

Free speech on campus: War on Christianity or equal-opportunity ideological battleground?

Free speech on campus: War on Christianity or equal-opportunity ideological battleground?

A pair of recent incidents on US campuses has again highlighted the issue of free speech. Is there really a "war on Christianity" happening on American campuses? In September, Polly Olsen sued Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, claiming staff had violated her free speech rights when they stopped her from handing out religiously-themed Valentines to her fellow students. An observer had complained of "suspicious activity" and Olsen was escorted to the campus security office and told her cards - which contained Christian messages like "Jesus Loves You" - might be considered "offensive," and that she was "soliciting" by distributing them outside the campus' designated "free speech zone."

Massive snowfall causes deadly traffic pile-up & vehicle explosion in Russia's south

Massive snowfall causes deadly traffic pile-up & vehicle explosion in Russia's south

Terrifying footage was captured when a car exploded during a massive vehicle collision in the Rostov region, where extreme weather conditions caused a major traffic incident on an expressway linking Moscow with southern Russia. One person died and at least two others sustained injuries, after some 15 cars collided on the M-4 Don highway following heavy snowfall on Tuesday. The major road incident caused heavy traffic on the border of the Rostov and Krasnodar Regions.

Public panicked after California wildfire tears through nuclear waste site

Public panicked after California wildfire tears through nuclear waste site

The Woolsey fire that engulfed over 90,000 acres in California last weekend may have spread toxic and radioactive substances from a Superfund site, according to activists who believe authorities might be downplaying the risks. The fire passed through the Santa Susana Field Lab (SSFL), a federal Superfund site in the Simi Hills that was the site of the worst nuclear meltdown in US history in 1959. While the California Department of Toxic Substances Control said there was no reason to be concerned of "any risks other than those normally present in a wildfire situation," locals aren't so sure, pointing out that the agency has dragged its feet in cleaning up toxic sites and accusing it of a possible cover-up. Physicians for Social Responsibility Los Angeles president Robert Dodge castigated the DTSC, pointing out that the site - now owned by Boeing - remains radioactive and polluted despite the agency's promise to clean it up eight years ago. "These toxic materials are in SSFL's soil...

Political Deadlock: Swedish Parliament rejects center-right PM candidate

Political Deadlock: Swedish Parliament rejects center-right PM candidate

Sweden's Riksdag has voted against Ulf Kristersson's candidacy for prime minister, after his center-right allies refused to create a future coalition that would rely on support from the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats. The previously expected result leaves Sweden without a permanent government two months after the election, an unprecedented political stalemate in the country's democratic history. The Sweden Democrats backed Kristersson's Moderates, but he received the support of only 154 deputies, short of the 175 majority needed. The 195 that voted against included the center-left, green and socialist parties, and the Liberal and Center parties, who campaigned together with Kristersson ahead of September's election.

Mentally unstable, cleaver-wielding migrant walks free in Berlin after 107 arrests

Mentally unstable, cleaver-wielding migrant walks free in Berlin after 107 arrests

A migrant from Ghana, notorious for his shoplifting sprees and violent outbursts, was arrested 107 times in Berlin, but none of them stuck. He even walked free after threatening to hack a woman with a meat cleaver. For years, a 59-year-old man known as Bismark B. made a living out of stealing from supermarkets in central Berlin. He would show up "three to four times a week" to steal food, a store employee told local media. Witnesses also said that he often grabbed the most expensive items and kept a journal of the things he stole. Bismark B. racked up 107 arrests, but was released each time because he was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia.

US troops erect razor fences in San Diego to thwart migrant caravan

US troops erect razor fences in San Diego to thwart migrant caravan

US military and border protection agents have extended razor wire and erected barricades at the point of entry near San Diego, California, as the first groups of migrants arrived at the US-Mexico border. Hundreds of migrants who had split off from the main 'caravan' arrived in Tijuana early Tuesday on nine buses. Numbering just over 350 people, they joined an initial, small group of around 85 people, mostly members of the LGBT community, who'd experienced discrimination within the main crowd and were helped to make it to the Mexican border town even earlier on Sunday.

Poverty tied to worse heart health among U.S. teens

Poverty tied to worse heart health among U.S. teens

Adolescents from low-income families are more likely than their affluent peers to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease like obesity, inactivity, poor nutrition and tobacco use, a U.S. study suggests. Income inequality has long been linked to disparities in heart disease risk among adults. The new study examined nationally representative data collected from 1999 to 2014 on 11,557 youth, ages 12 to 19, and found that household finances might also impact heart health for teens. Low-income adolescents may have a greater risk for heart disease at least partly because they learn health habits from their families, and less affluent adults are more likely to smoke or be obese, said study leader Sandra Jackson of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Pilot dead after yet another T-38 supersonic jet crashes at base in Texas

Pilot dead after yet another T-38 supersonic jet crashes at base in Texas

A US Air Force pilot was killed as a T-38 Talon supersonic training plane crashed at Laughlin Air Force Base in Texas on Tuesday night, making it the fifth accident involving the same aircraft model in the last 12 months. The two-seat jet crashed around 7:40pm local time, the base reported. One pilot was killed, while another was hospitalized. The military didn't provide details of the circumstances of the crash. An official probe has been launched. According to the aviation blog The Warzone, this is the fifth time a military T-38 has crashed in the last 12 months.

CDC investigating burst of possible new cases of polio-like paralysis, as mystery persists

CDC investigating burst of possible new cases of polio-like paralysis, as mystery persists

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating roughly 160 additional reports of children with illnesses similar to the polio-like paralysis that is puzzling health officials, officials said Tuesday. So far this year, officials have confirmed 90 cases of acute flaccid myelitis, a condition in which the gray matter of the spinal cord becomes damaged, leading to muscle weakness and paralysis in one or multiple limbs. It is called AFM for short. Still, the CDC does not yet know what is causing the spike in cases. Scientists are exploring a range of possible explanations, including whether the condition may be caused by an aberrant immune response to an infection, not the infection itself, Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of agency's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters.

More Melbourne terror: Three men found guilty of plotting Christmas Day attacks

More Melbourne terror: Three men found guilty of plotting Christmas Day attacks

Three Melbourne men have been found guilty of plotting a Christmas terror attack at major city landmarks in a jihad-inspired plan to inflict mass carnage. It can now be revealed Ahmed Mohamed, 26, Abdullah Chaarani, 28, and Hamza Abbas, 23, were on November 2 found guilty of conspiring to plan or prepare for a terrorist act, after a Supreme Court jury deliberated for six days. Comment: It apparently wasn't cut-and-dried. The guilty verdicts, which came at the end of a long trial, followed an earlier guilty plea by the fourth member and ringleader of the would-be terror group, Ibrahim Abbas, 24, Hamza's brother. The verdicts were suppressed from when they were announced, following an application by lawyers for two of the men. Justice Christopher Beale later ruled the verdicts should be reported, however defence lawyers challenged the judge's decision at the Court of Appeal. The reasons behind the suppression cannot be reported.

Open-access journal editors resign after alleged pressure to publish mediocre papers

Open-access journal editors resign after alleged pressure to publish mediocre papers

All 10 senior editors of the open-access journal Nutrients resigned last month, alleging that the publisher, the Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), pressured them to accept manuscripts of mediocre quality and importance. The conflict is familiar for many commercial open-access publishers: Because authors pay fees per published article (about $1800 in the case of Nutrients), the publisher has an incentive to publish as many as possible. On the other hand, scientists prefer to publish in choosy, reputable journals, and academic journal editors want to maintain this quality. On 15 August, the editor-in-chief of the journal, Jon Buckley, of the University of South Australia in Adelaide, received an email from MDPI announcing his replacement at the end of the year by someone who would "bring different ideas on board." Buckley says this was an excuse to push him aside because of his strict editorial policy. He resigned immediately, and nine other senior editors...

Afghan-led peace process facilitated by Russia exposes billion dollar failure of US in the region

Afghan-led peace process facilitated by Russia exposes billion dollar failure of US in the region

On November 9, 2018, Russia hosted the first round of Moscow initiative to resolve the Afghan conundrum, signifying its ever increasing interest in the country that has evolved, over the last 17 years, from a hot-bed of conflict between the US and the Taliban, including Al-Qaeda, to a strategic stalemate between the US and the Taliban, witnessing also the discreet rise of the Islamic State in Khorasan (IS-K) in Afghanistan, threatening the entire Central Asia and Russia with its tendency to reach beyond the land it comes to inhabit. The rising threat of IS-K explains why Russia has become active in initiating a peace process to achieve its settlement, but for the Western officials, Russian initiative is only an attempt on its part to make things 'complicated' for a peace process that must be 'Afghan-led & Afghan owned.' This is not only ironic given that the West, specifically the US, has failed to end the war in the 17 years, but also factually wrong since Moscow initiative...

Merkel joins Macron in call for European army - There's just the small issue of NATO treaties

Merkel joins Macron in call for European army - There's just the small issue of NATO treaties

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has called for a "real, true" European army to be created, just days after French President Emmanuel Macron did the same - and received backlash from Donald Trump for doing so. "We should work on a vision of one day establishing a real European army," Merkel said during an address to MEPs at the European Parliament in Strasbourg on Monday. That statement was an apparent nod of support to Macron, who last week said that Europe has to "protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia, and even the United States of America." Europe cannot do so, he said, "unless we decide to have a true European army."

PM May calls in MPs as Brexit deal "agreed"...except a 'few outstanding issues'

PM May calls in MPs as Brexit deal "agreed"...except a 'few outstanding issues'

Prime Minister Theresa May is to chair a special cabinet meeting, Wednesday, after a draft deal was reportedly agreed between UK and EU negotiators following intensive talks in Brussels. According to an unnamed cabinet source, cited in the BBC, the text has been agreed upon at a technical level. Cabinet ministers are, on Tuesday evening, having one-on-one meetings with the PM as she attempts to win their backing for the deal. Ministers will reportedly be allowed to see the key papers on the deal, but not allowed to take them home.

Saudi intelligence, Mossad met with Trump admin to plan sabotage and assassinations in Iran

Saudi intelligence, Mossad met with Trump admin to plan sabotage and assassinations in Iran

A new report published in The New York Times has revealed that top Saudi intelligence officials with ties to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS), in meetings with figures close to the Trump administration and Israel intelligence, expressed interest in using private contractors to "sabotage the Iranian economy" and to assassinate top Iranian officials. The plan to use private intelligence operatives to sabotage Iran's economy had been developed by George Nader, an American-Lebanese businessman close to Trump and the United Arab Emirates and a convicted sex offender, and Joel Zamel, an Israeli known for his "deep ties" to Israeli intelligence and security agencies. The plan, at the time of the meeting, did not include the assassination component, though the Saudi officials present sought to probe whether such acts could be included in the campaign. The Times noted that both Nader and Zamel "saw their Iran plan both as a lucrative source of income and as a way to cripple a...

List of 390 drugs that can affect blood glucose levels

List of 390 drugs that can affect blood glucose levels

What drugs affect glucose levels? Many can, including steroids, anxiety and depression medications, statins, beta-blockers, some acne & asthma medications. Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available as a downloadable PDF: 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels (pdf)

Bread-crust bubbles: Scientists discover new type of volcanic ash

Bread-crust bubbles: Scientists discover new type of volcanic ash

Bread-crust bubble Bred krəst ˈbəb(ə)l n. Tiny, gas-filled beads of volcanic ash with a scaly surface. Scientists have identified a new type of volcanic ash that erupted from a volcano in central Oregon roughly 7 million years ago. The particles are similar to larger bread-crust bombs, which form as gases trapped inside globs of lava expand, cracking the bombs' tough exterior. Bread-crust bubbles, each no more than a millimeter wide, have a distinctly crackled surface that can reveal secrets about how volcanoes erupt, researchers reported November 4 at the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Indianapolis. The researchers had been sifting through other types of volcanic ash in the lab when they spotted the strange ash formations. Viewing the bits of ash through a scanning electron microscope revealed their crusty texture, indicating the gas bubbles expanded rapidly on their way up to Earth's surface, but did not pop. Analysis of the texture also indicated the bubbles'...

Smart cities - dumb people. 5G's corporate holy grail

Smart cities - dumb people. 5G's corporate holy grail

There's a lot of hype about 5G, the fifth-generation wireless technology that is being rolled out in various "5G test beds" in major cities including Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, New York, and Los Angeles. But it's hard to see why we should be excited. Proponents talk about the facilitation of driverless vehicles and car-to-car "talk," better Virtual Reality equipment, and, of course, "The Internet of Things" (IoT) - the holy grail of Big Tech that is just vague enough to sound sort of promising. But when it comes to specifics, there seems to be a lot of hot air in the IoT bag. For example, in March 2018, Canada's Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains, while pumping $400 million into 5G test beds, reportedly "gushed" about IoT applications, including "refrigerators that monitor food levels and automatically order fresh groceries." Then there is the 5G proponent who enthused to CBC News (March 19, 2018) about "augmented reality headsets" being replaced by "a pair of normal looking...

Autonomic nervous system directly controls stem cell proliferation, study shows

Autonomic nervous system directly controls stem cell proliferation, study shows

Somatic stem cells are microscopic workhorses, constantly regenerating cells throughout the body: skin and the lining of the intestine, for example. And to University of Illinois neuroscientists, they represent untapped potential. "If we could find a way to target and control stem cell proliferation in the body, there could be potential medical benefits, including turning off the proliferation of cancer stem cells or inducing proliferation of somatic stem cells where we want to grow tissue," says Elizabeth Davis, doctoral researcher in the Neuroscience Program at U of I and lead author of a study that demonstrates, for the first time, that stem cell proliferation is directly controlled by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS controls all of our unconscious functions: breathing, blood flow, digestion, and so forth. Its two major networks of nerve fibers run from the brain through the entire body, with neurons reaching into nearly every organ. These neurons release chemicals...

Three unusually early snows make Kansas City weather history

Three unusually early snows make Kansas City weather history

If you think winter weather has come early to the Kansas City area this year, you're not wrong. The first snow came on Oct. 14, when Kansas City had its earliest measurable snowfall in more than a century - .2 of an inch at Kansas City International Airport. That broke a 120-year-old record. The last time it snowed this early in Kansas City was on Oct. 17, 1898, when 3.3 inches of snow fell, according to the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill. The average first measurable snowfall date for Kansas City is Nov. 28. The metro's second snow, 1.3 inches at KCI, came on Thursday. And on Monday, Kansas City had its third winter storm, which dropped 1 to 3 inches of snow across much of the metropolitan area. KCI reported .5 of an inch of snow. This is only the third year in the city's 131 years of recorded weather history where it has seen three measurable snow events by Nov. 12. The other two years were in 1898 and 1992, according to the Weather Service.

'Post 9/11 US veterans don't have the illusion of righteousness about the wars they fought'

'Post 9/11 US veterans don't have the illusion of righteousness about the wars they fought'

This generation of US veterans is facing the invalidity of the wars they fought, having been treated like puppets of the government in the execution of the unjust military action, Iraq war combat veteran Adam Kokesh told RT. A new study has found that American soldiers who were part of the 'War on Terror' are struggling to make ends meet. They are facing greater hardship than veterans of previous generations. "Post 9/11 veterans have become the first and only generation of veterans to struggle with housing affordability compared to civilians of like ages and demographics," according to the study.

Acting U.S. Attorney General to consult with ethics officials about involvement in Russia probe

Acting U.S. Attorney General to consult with ethics officials about involvement in Russia probe

Acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will consult with ethics officials about whether his past criticism of a special investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election requires him to recuse himself, the Justice Department said. Whitaker "is fully committed to following all appropriate processes and procedures at the Department of Justice, including consulting with senior ethics officials on his oversight responsibilities and matters that may warrant recusal," department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said late on November 12. President Donald Trump named Whitaker acting attorney general last week after ousting Jeff Sessions, who Trump had criticized repeatedly for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, which Trump has labeled a "witch hunt."

Mysterious booming music pulsates across the Delaware River keeping residents awake

Mysterious booming music pulsates across the Delaware River keeping residents awake

A repetitive, full bass has been pulsing through homes across the Delaware River on the Atlantic coast of the US since the summer, agonizing New Jersey residents living in the towns of Carneys Point, Penns Grove and Pennsville. Although it had been heard multiple times throughout the summer, there has been a spate of music during the past couple of weeks, NJ.com reported at the end of last month. "It was like a sickening, pulsing heartbeat. We turned up our television but could not overpower the throb," Monica Morris Lind, who lives off the Delaware River, told the media outlet.

Saudi-led coalition agrees to UN evacuation of injured Houthis in Yemen

Saudi-led coalition agrees to UN evacuation of injured Houthis in Yemen

The Saudi-led coalition, supporting the Yemeni internationally-recognized government in the civil conflict with the Houthis, has agreed to allow the UN to evacuate up to 50 injured rebels to neighbouring Oman after the visit of UK Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt to Saudi Arabia and the UAE, the UK Foreign Office said. "The Saudi-led Coalition have agreed to the evacuation of wounded Houthis from Yemen, one of the key stumbling blocks to the UN Geneva talks in September. Subject to final reassurances, Coalition forces will now permit the UN to oversee a Houthi medical evacuation, including up to 50 wounded fighters, to Oman, ahead of another proposed round of peace talks in Sweden later this month," the office said in a statement published on its official website.

Tommy Robinson barred from entry into US to attend conservative event on Islam

Tommy Robinson barred from entry into US to attend conservative event on Islam

Robinson, founder of the English Defence League (EDL), who is currently on bail after being charged with contempt of court, will have to wait "a while" for a US visa to be granted, according to neoconservative Daniel Pipes - the president of Middle East Forum (MEF), a conservative think-tank. According to the Press Association, Robinson has labelled reports he has been denied a visa as "fake news." In 2013 Robinson - real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon - was jailed for 10 months for entering the US using someone else's passport. The far-right activist turned self-styled journalist, has a myriad of other convictions to his name, including drug offenses, a number of assaults, leading a football riot and mortgage fraud.